Tucker County Culture

ART

Tucker County is home to one of the most diverse and active arts communities in the region. [MORE]

MUSIC

Bluegrass, Hip Hop, and anything in-between, you are bound to find music that reflects our communities anytime of year. [MORE]

HISTORY & HERITAGE

Tucker County’s rich history is visible and pervasive in our culture. [MORE]

RECREATION

This is the land we play in, and it is also the land we live in. [MORE]

our mission

To preserve and advance Tucker County culture.

There is already strong community-based support in Tucker County to encourage, develop, and enhance the various aspects of the cultural tourism component of the regional economy. Opportunities exist to create, expand, and compliment areas of cultural, historical, archaeological and industrial heritage, and educational interest in Tucker County.

The Authority seeks to plan and execute an ongoing and continuous program for the development and enhancement of artistic, cultural, historical, and recreational attractions that will promote culture, education, and tourism in Tucker County.

Learn more about our Performance Agenda

art

Woman on Bike by Rebecca Wudarski

Tucker County is home to one of the most diverse and active arts communities in the region. The towns together boast seven art galleries, 12 open door studios, three venues which host live music, numerous businesses that actively show local art, and a rotating exhibition at the courthouse in the county seat. There’s also an arts festival – ArtSpring, a film festival – Plum Tuckered Film Festival, and an acclaimed music festival – Pickin’ in Parsons.

The unique natural beauty of the area has long been an attraction to artists wishing to draw inspiration from this diverse, pristine area. At the same time, many contemporary and non-traditional artists are drawn to the area for its creative community, producing pieces one would expect to find in an urban setting. The diversity of resident artists yields an unexpected and impressive show of work spread across the area. Wandering through the shops, restaurants galleries, and studios, it’s clear to see how the arts are an integral part of the identity of Tucker County.

Art spaces of Tucker County open year round

music

Mountain music pervades Tucker County. Bluegrass, Hip Hop, and everything in-between, you are bound to find music that reflects our communities throughout the year. Our largest music festival is Pickin’ in Parsons, but you can hear live music nearly every day of the week at The Purple Fiddle, Mountain State Brewing Co., Mill Race Park, or one of the resorts — Timberline Four Seasons or Canaan Valley State Park.

The Mountain Music Trail and the Mountain Dance Trail encompass five counties along U.S. Route 219, which goes straight through Tucker County. Special concerts and dances are hosted here regularly. Musicians are flocking to the area to be a part of the unique arts and music movement that is happening here in Tucker County.

Mountain music pervades Tucker County. Whether it’s bluegrass, Hip Hop, or anything in-between, you are bound to find music that reflects our communities anytime during the year. Our biggest music festival is Pickin’ in Parsons, but you can also hear live music nearly every day of the week whether that’s at The Purple Fiddle, Mountain State Brewing Co., Mill Race Park, or one of the resorts — Timberline Four Seasons or Canaan Valley State Park.

The Mountain Music Trail and the Mountain Dance Trail encompass five counties along U.S. Route 219, which goes straight through Tucker County. Special concerts and dances are hosted here regularly. Musicians are flocking to the area to be a part of the unique arts and music movement that is happening here in Tucker.

Music Spaces and Resources

history & heritage

“Tucker County was formed from Randolph County by an act of the General Assembly of Virginia on March 7, 1856,” (from the introduction to Cleta M. Long’s History of Tucker County).

Tucker County’s rich history is visible and pervasive in our culture. Exploring the county will make this evident. Mill buildings and coke ovens survive as unique landmarks from Tucker’s booming years of the coal and timber industries. Corrick’s Ford Battlefield, on the edge of Parsons, marks the site where the first general of the Civil War died (Confederate General Robert S. Garnett), resulting in the Union army’s control of “Western” Virginia. Landmarks and monuments are scattered across the county — some of which (the Fairfax Stone and the Potomac Stone) have been the subject of land disputes between West Virginia and Maryland. Isolated chimneys stand as testament to the area’s settlers, and our downtowns are filled with buildings more than a century old.

The National Register of Historic Places has officially recognized nine locations in Tucker County, including Cottrill’s Opera House in Thomas, the Tucker County Courthouse, and the Thomas Commercial Historic District.

“Tucker County was formed from Randolph County by an act of the General Assembly of Virginia on March 7, 1856,” (from the introduction to Cleta M. Long’s History of Tucker County).

Tucker County’s rich history is visible and pervasive in our culture. Exploring the county will make this evident. Mill buildings and coke ovens survive as unique landmarks from Tucker’s booming years of coal and timber industry. Corrick’s Ford Battlefield, on the edge of Parsons, marks the site where the first general of the Civil War died (Confederate General Robert S. Garnett), resulting in the Union control of “Western” Virginia. Landmarks and monuments are scattered across the county — some of which (the Fairfax Stone and the Potomac Stone) have been the subject of land disputes between West Virginia and Maryland. Isolated chimneys stand as testament to the area’s settlers, and our downtowns are filled with buildings more than a century old.

The National Register of Historic Places has officially recognized nine locations in Tucker County, including Cottrill’s Opera House in Thomas, Tucker County Courthouse, and the Thomas Commercial Historic District.

Resources and Publications


recreation


With more than 50% of Tucker County’s geography being protected lands, what remains is incredibly important to us here. We have three state parks — Blackwater Falls, Canaan Valley Resort, and Fairfax Stone — two designated wilderness areas — Dolly Sods and Otter Creek — the Canaan Valley Wildlife Refuge, and the Monogehela National Forest. The land here is transformed each season, and we like to take advantage of the outdoor opportunities surrounding us.

Locals and visitors alike tour the county’s natural resources by hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, bird watching, skiing, snowshoeing, sledding, tubing, rafting, birding, and more. There are endless outdoor opportunities in the county.

This is the land that we play in, but it is also the land we live in. Farmers markets, community gardens, food and farm initiatives, and a farm discovery center, combine to provide the county with fresh local foods and to educate the county and its visitors. Tucker County has honey makers, bread bakers, beer brewers, gardeners, farmers, and more. Whether you are a local or tourist, we hope you enjoy and learn from this land.

Resources


With more than 50% of Tucker County’s geography being protected lands, what remains is incredibly important to us here. We have three state parks — Blackwater Falls, Canaan Valley Resort, and Fairfax Stone — two designated wilderness areas — Dolly Sods and Otter Creek — the Canaan Valley Wildlife Refuge, and the Monongahela National Forest. The land here is transformed each season, and we like to take advantage of the outdoor opportunities surrounding us.

Locals and visitors alike tour the county’s natural resources by hiking, biking, fishing, hunting, bird watching, skiing, snowshoeing, sledding, tubing, rafting, birding, and more. There are endless outdoor opportunities in the county.

This is the land that we play in, but it is also the land we live in. Farmers markets, community gardens, food and farm initiatives, and a farm discovery center, combine to provide the county with fresh local foods and to educate the county and its visitors. Tucker County has honey makers, bread bakers, beer brewers, gardeners, farmers, and more. Whether you are a local or tourist, we hope you enjoy and learn from this land.

board of directors

 

Brad Moore

President

Brad...

is a gardener, home renovator, and amateur water scientist who believes in Mardi Gras. As a practicing outdoor recreationist, he enjoys skiing, fishing, boating, biking, and ball sports, and he thinks that flies should be tied.

Robert Burns

Treasurer

Robert...

was born and raised in Tucker County except for the years he attended WVU, getting his masters in economics. He has served multiple roles in Tucker County, including Parsons City Council, Economic Development Authority Director, and the Executive Director of the Tucker Community Foundation. In these roles he’s managed $10 million in federal grants, helped small businesses thrive, and worked in many other charitable fields.

Tim Turner

Vice President

Tim...

joined board of the Cultural District Authority because of his love for Tucker County. His ancestors were from the Flanagan Hill Area. Tim and his wife, whose family owned parts of what is now the Canaan Valley Golf Course and Timberline, have a collection of photos and resources that he shares with the Parsons Advocate, Tucker County’s local newspaper. He feels it is important to share what he and his wife have because it sparks interest and generates stories that might otherwise be lost.

Jessica Waldo

Executive Director
CVB & Chamber of Commerce

Jessica...

is the Executive Director of the Tucker County Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Chamber of Commerce. She and her husband live in Canaan Valley and spend their time off skiing, hiking, and enjoying all that Tucker County has to offer.

Cory Chase

Cory...

was born and raised in Canaan Valley where he and his family were caretakers for a large cattle farm. They came to Canaan to start their own business: a cross country ski area with a restaurant and catering. Cory has been a small business owner as a licensed massage therapist for 15 years.

Emily
Wilson-Hauger

Emily...

is a Program Manager for Woodlands Development Group, a community development nonprofit, where she helps communities develop affordable housing, redevelop downtown areas, restore dilapidated buildings, clean up brownfield sites, and facilitate community planning efforts.
Emily lives in Davis with her husband and daughter.

 

Lowell Moore

 

performance agenda


Early in our founding, we decided it was necessary to adopt a cultural tourism vision for Tucker County so that we could make informed, community-based decisions as cultural tourism developed. This document is a plan to accomplish that vision. Its contents are the result of a great deal of research conducted by West Virginia University Faculty as well as a series of public meetings hosted by the Tucker County Cultural District Authority. To both lead tourism growth and also maintain Tucker’s authenticity, we have adopted four tenets which you will see reflected in our Performance Agenda: Protect, Connect, Enhance, and Promote. This Performance Agenda will be a guide as the Cultural District Authority begins working to achieve its vision.

Voices of Change – Stories of Tourism Development in Tucker County, West Virginia

Produced by West Virginia University Rural Tourism Design Team

contact us


Phone: (304) 704-4657
Address: P.O. Box 491 Parsons, WV 26287
Email: tuckerculture@gmail.com